Noteworthy Classic……..v5 Soul Food

Soul Food, Goodie Mob, 1995

2011 was looking to end with a series of disasters for me personally.  I was determined to make the year end on a positive note and the success of The Product video really was the catalyst for the beginning of a new and better year.  New Years Eve was spent drawing and willing a better year from the second the ball dropped, but the soundtrack for that night was Soul Food by Goodie Mob.  If you haven’t heard this album, you’ve been missing out, but I have your back!

Soul Food was really the second album that introduced to the sounds coming out of the South.  The first was obviously Outkast’s Southernplayalisticadillacmuzik.  I think if you look at where Southern hip hop started and where southern hip hop is today, it’s a sad story.  But, I think it’s a matter of how it’s represented in popular media more than anything else.  The same goes for hip hop in general for 2011.  There are still intelligent and creative southern lyricists that don’t get the airplay that many other rappers do.  Soul Food is where the term “dirty south” originated, which makes  it a trendsetter.  Lyrically, artists like Killer Mike, T.I., Currensy and Jay Electronica carry the torch today, but Goodie Mob and Outkast really set the stage back in ’93-’94.

For everyone going back to the 90′s hip hop scene for inspiration, there was a lot more than Biggie and 2Pac.  I think its important for everyone that wasn’t really up on the hip hop scene in the 90′s to be aware of all the amazing music from that time.  There were inspiring new artists from all over the country and Goodie Mob helped establish hip hop in Atlanta.  If you’ve never heard the album and you’re looking for some dope hip hop, go pick up Soul Food; you won’t be disappointed.

 

Ronin